Visits to the White House are becoming old hat for Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson and cornerback Richard Sherman.

Two weeks removed from special invitation appearances at the White House correspondents' dinner, Sherman presented President Barack Obama with a blue flag bearing the "12" logo signifying the boisterous fans known in Seattle as the 12th Man, highlighting the Super Bowl champions' visit at the East Room of the White House on Wednesday.

Sherman, outfitted in a navy blue suit and lavender bowtie, stood shoulder to shoulder with Wilson and his teammates as Obama, general manager John Schneider and team president Peter McLoughlin reached the stage.

"Let's give it up for this quiet bunch known as the Seattle Seahawks," Obama opened. "I considered letting Sherman up here and giving him the mic, but we've got to go in a little bit."

Obama congratulated coach Pete Carroll for outstanding leadership, saying it is "pretty clear he does things the right way."

"Thank you, Mr. President," Carroll said. "I can't believe I'm saying that. ... We've very proud to be here."

Carroll said the "Legion of Boom is just a phone call away," should the country need assistance.

To Schneider, who donned a championship belt to lighten the mood during Super Bowl week, Obama zinged: "I'm curious where the belt is today, John."

Obama said he did not need to go into detail on the greatness of the team -- because it was able to trumpet its own brilliance all season.

"We're here to celebrate the first Super Bowl victory for the city of Seattle," Obama said.

A team with plenty of personality was missing one of its most identifiable players, running back Marshawn Lynch.

"I am sorry Marshawn's not here, because I admire his approach to the press," the President said, a quip noting Lynch's unwillingness to speak much during Super Bowl media sessions.

Wilson, sporting a military shave haircut in stark contrast to his springy curls during the team's playoff run, and the Seahawks were also congratulated for their off-field exploits, including $700,000 raised for charity.

"As a guy who was elected president named Barack Obama, I root for the underdogs," Obama said, reminding of Wilson's path to the Seahawks being lined with doubters and Sherman's upbringing in a rough neighborhood. "Seeing folks overcome the odds excites me. It also excites me seeing a whole be greater than the sum of its parts."

Obama called the CenturyLink Field, which twice set decibel-level records last season, "kind of cheating" and questioned the physics involved in creating such a raucous environment before congratulating the "12s."