PALM DESERT, Calif. -

Across the nation, Eric Cantor's loss came as a total shock.

Cantor went down to defeat to a relatively unknown, tea party-backed college professor, David Brat.

"Those of us 3,000 miles away didn't know the intensity of the campaign going on," said Lt. General Herb Temple, a Valley Republican and former president of the Lincoln Club. "There's been an upset and now Republicans will be concerned what that means."

Temple, who served on former President Ronald Reagan's staff, says Republicans shouldn't be concerned.

"We're getting a new face in the Republican party. Eric Cantor has been a very able legislator and he will be missed by the nation and by Congress, but the new man coming in has a strong background in his life," Temple said.

He counters the argument the more conservative candidate could make waves in the GOP's current strategy.

"I think it's too early for him to begin to influence the direction of the party. He will be an interesting new face on the roster so to speak but I don't think he's going to influence very much for a while," Temple said.

Temple says it's also a positive sign campaign dollars don't always determine votes. Cantor spent $5 million on his re-election campaign, 50 times more than what Brat spent.

"Dollars do not vote, you do," Brat said at his post-election party Tuesday night.

"I think it's a healthy result that money is not always the determinant of who will emerge as the winner it shows that people are thinking about the issues than we had given them credit for," Temple said.
   
Temple thinks it also allows for other Republicans to move up the leadership ranks, adding that since nobody predicted the cantor loss, we shouldn't be quick to predict its consequences.

"We're losing a fine legislator but another fine legislator will come along and we have some very capable Californians in Congress and perhaps one of those will emerge," Temple said.