But even at that distance, Marie's counterclockwise swirl is still washing waves up the California coastline. Beaches facing the south and southeast will get hit with the heaviest surf.

Surfers' joy

It's great for surfers. It's where they want their waves. And how they like them.

And this is the second time in short order that they've gotten them. Tropical Storm Lowell, which is petering out, served them up nicely, too.

Surfers will be looking for "select focal points," as Surfline, a website for surfing enthusiasts, calls them, where its forecasters predict some waves cresting at well over 18 feet.

It's more than high enough to make for tall "pipes": the hollow air tubes that top-heavy waves form when they roll over on themselves.

Surfers love navigating them, and Surfline will be following the action via a slew of webcams.

Surf forecasters have broken down the height of the surf by time of day and particular beach.

"The Wedge," a point just off of Corona Del Mar, looks like the place to be.