LA QUINTA, Calif. -

"Bullying has changed. It's not just one on one, it's cyber bullying, and groups," Sally Diane said. 

It happens a lot. We sat down with psychotherapist Sally Diane, who tells us the signs your kids are victims.

"Kids who start isolating in their bedroom, seem to withdraw, don't have a lot of friends themselves. Seem to be irritable and moody. Stomach aches," Diane said. 

There are things you can do as a parent to help make sure your child isn't the bully. 

"If I have grown up in a culture where I'm treated with respect and you are treated with respect, chances are bullying won't be an issue," she said. 

"If I have grown up in a culture where I'm treated with respect and you are treated with respect, chances are bullying won't be an issue," she said. 

Interestingly, Diane says it all comes down to how we feel about ourselves.   

"If I'm a bully, chances are, undoubtedly I have low self esteem. If I am a victim, that will crash any self esteem I may be developing because middle school and highschool are fragile times for the psyche."

We talked to Jeff Kaye  from Desert Sands Unified School District. They have a plan in place where kids can report bullying anonymously, and they're working on more anti-bullying tactics.

"The spotter program, just like in a gym you have to have someone help you get the weight off your shoulders. We are starting younger to teach kids you have to look out for each other," Kaye said. 

Parents tell us it's all about communication. Diane confirms that.

"Address it. Talk to your child, share experiences they might have had about bullying, concerns they have about bullying. A bully is someone who feels inadequate themselves," she said.