RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. -

Nearly 400,000 Americans depend on dialysis to survive. For the past six years, Lynda Samen of La Quinta Quinta has been one of them.

She undergoes treatments four times a week in Palm Desert. She said a common and messy issue for many patients is bleeding after they leave the clinic.

"They usually get out to the lobby and come back with three people holding their arm and they're bleeding. It's terrifying and unnecessary because you can prevent that," said Samen.

To help, Samen invented the "Safe-T-Sleeve," which she calls a "Band-Aid for your bandages." The sleeve slips on over the access site and applies pressure to help control bleeding and contain blood after dialysis treatments.

"It puts pressure on those bandages and has a liner inside, so (the blood) has somewhere to go other than your clothes and car," said Samen.

The inside liner is disposable and the sleeve itself can be washed in time for the next treatment. The sleeve features a plastic window, allowing patients to monitor their artificial vein/graft and spot any leaks.   

Samen said it helps give patients the freedom to shamelessly go on with their daily routines.

"It's really valuable to go on with my life. I don't worry about what's going to happen, instead I think what I want for lunch. Not many people can do that. I just put on my Safe-T-Sleeve," she said.

Her doctor, Rodolfo Batarse at Desert Kidney Care in Rancho Mirage, said good nutrition is key and so is some insight from those battling kidney disease.

"We defer to our patients to teach us and we can learn from them. Those folks who have the ideas to better themselves and those battling the same disease is admirable," said Batarse.

Samen prescribes joy.

"I think it's really important as a dialysis patient to be grateful for every single day because you never know," she said. "I think the bleeding is what scared me the most; I wanted to stop it and I have."

For the cost and more information on the Safe-T-Sleeve, visit www.safetysleevedialysiscover.com