THOUSAND PALMS- Calif. -

A 6.9 magnitude earthquake struck 50 miles west of Eureka, California Sunday at 10:18 pm. 

To put that in perspective, the Northridge earthquake in 1994 had a magnitude of 6.7. In addition, the Joshua Tree earthquake in 1992 had a 6.1 magnitude. 

Northern California was not the only place that felt a jolt Sunday evening. Although unrelated, several quakes hit near the Coachella Valley as well. However, it is likely they were not felt by many.

At 3:18 pm Sunday, a 1.1 magnitude earthquake struck six miles from Idyllwild. Not long after, a magnitude 1.2 earthquake was reported near Morongo Valley.

Earthquakes of all magnitudes serve as a reminder to always be prepared. In the event the next big earthquake hits home, there are several measures one can take to be sure they are prepared.

First, build an emergency kit to keep in your home. Fill it with enough food, water and supplies to last 72 hours. Fasten shelves securely and be sure large objects are closer to the ground. Secure heavy items, such as mirrors or artwork, on the wall and make sure they are not over beds or other places one may sit. Locate "safe spots" in each room -- these can be either under a sturdy table or against an inside wall. Finally, hold earthquake drills in your home. 

The Coachella Valley is sandwiched between the San Jacinto and San Andreas Fault lines. Both faults have been unseasonably quiet for 300 years. 

Seismologists say we are well overdue for a big quake. According to the United States Geological Survey, there is a 60% chance a big earthquake will shake Southern California over the next 30 years.