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Exclusive look at new Palm Springs marijuana cultivation facility

Site using green technology for plants

WATCH: New Palm Springs marijuana cultivation facility uses green technology

PALM SPRINGS, Calif. - Something is growing in Palm Springs.


 
"This is the newest, this is the latest and greatest," Charlie Kieley, Director of Operations for PSA Organica said. "I believe that we've set the bar extremely high here."

The brainchild of Kieley and PSA Organica Owner Julie Montante of PSA Organica, the dispensary opened a cannabis cultivation site.

KESQ and CBS Local 2 got an exclusive, inside look at the 20-thousand square-foot, multi-million dollar project. 


  
"We believe that this is the most state-of-the-art facility in the world, or one of them," Kieley said. "Everything from sanitation, from cleanliness, from the time you enter the building, until the time the product leaves, has been thought out."

This includes a factor, Kieley and Montante said, is one of a kind throughout Southern California. 

"The biggest and most notable of all of those things is the zero-waste aspect of this facility," Kieley said.

Kieley said the way it works is tanks are filled with 300 gallons of city water and condensation from their air conditioning systems to be used for plants. 

After the plants are watered, the water then comes back into a room, where it goes into a wastewater treatment system to be used again on the plants. 

This, they said, eliminates the need for a septic tank or sewer system. 

"We live in the desert, water is our most valuable and precious commodity and resource," Kieley said. "It takes a massive amount of water to run a facility like this. So, it's in all of our best interest to use these resources wisely."

It's a trend both hope to see flow forward in the future, with lots of people looking forward to Jan. 1, when it's expected adults around the state can purchase recreational marijuana. 

"I think people, the shock value and stigma, is now going to disappear once recreational comes," Montante said. "I also feel, down the road, we'll be able to give tours to certain facilities [and] certain people. [And] have them come in and see what this is really about."

Palm Springs City Councilmember Ginny Foat expressed her interest for the project. 

Kieley said they have plans to expand to another 20-thousand square feet on the property, with construction expected to be complete in nine months. 


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