LOS ANGELES, Calif. -

A rude awakening for people living in the Los Angeles area following a strong earthquake Monday morning.

An earthquake with an epicenter in Westwood struck at about 6:25 a.m. Monday, authorities said.

Initial reports by the U.S. Geological Survey said the temblor was a magnitude 4.7, but that number quickly downgraded to 4.4.

The jolt was felt as far away as Palmdale and Camarillo.

"I could feel all upstairs shaking. Everything in my house shaking and picture behind me starts going like this and I say maybe I need to get out of the bed. then I'm calling for my sister Mary do you feel that," said Encino resident Phyllis Rahming.

The 4.4 earthquake was followed by a series of small aftershocks. Officials said there likely will be more in the coming days.

Despite  being relatively close to the Los Angeles area, we didn't feel any shaking here in the desert. However, the San Andreas fault is in our backyard and experts say we need to be prepared, we've been long overdue for the so-called "big one."

"This is a little reminder to stock up on Food and water and have an emergency kit at home," said Dr. Egill Hauksson, a seismologist.

The desert already has an early regional warning system known as "CREWS" in place at fire stations and Sunline bases. It's designed to give up to a 30-second warning before the shaking starts during a major quake. The company behind it wants to expand the system into schools and hospitals.

There were no immediate damage reports or injuries in Monday's quake, Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman Brian Humphrey said.

All Metro rail lines will experience minor delays this morning as crews inspect tracks for possible damage from the earthquake, according to Metro officials.   

The 6:25 a.m. Monday quake occurred at a depth of about 5 miles.