THOUSAND PALMS, Calif. -

A new study by a research and analysis website has ranked the safest and most dangerous towns and cities in the state which includes several desert communities.

A report by the insurance based research and analysis website ValuePenguin.com came up with an way to rank the safest and most dangerous towns and cities in the state of California.

The process is a little complicated but in a nutshell the company took FBI statistics of property and violent crimes from 2014 and coupled those numbers with population and came up with a crime score. The higher the ranking, the safer the city.

For example, the City of Imperial is statistically the safest city at number 1. The city of Emeryville, which is next to Oakland is statistically the most dangerous city coming in at number 417.

Below is the list of desert and mountain communities listed from safest to most dangerous according the the report. The number next to the name of the city is it's spot on the list of all 417 California communities in the report.

76. Twentynine Palms

100. Indian Wells

182. Beaumont

206. Cathedral City

235. Banning

242. Yucca Valley

273. Rancho Mirage

279. Coachella

281. La Quinta

339. Indio

353. Palm Desert

378. Desert Hot Springs

393. Big Bear Lake

406. Palm Springs

North Shore, Mecca, Thermal, Bermuda Dunes, Thousand Palms, Cabazon, Idyllwild, and Joshua Tree were not included in the study.

SEE THE FULL LIST OF ALL CALIFORNIA CITIES

According to their website this is the methodology the company used:

"To rank these places, we collected data from the 2014 FBI crime statistics by city, which provides the most recent crime data available. Not every town participates in this report and we also excluded towns with fewer than 5,000 residents because towns with small populations are more sensitive to crime score fluctuations for fewer crimes committed. The raw data report included property crimes (burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson), and violent crimes (murder/manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault) from all law enforcement agencies that chose to partake in the FBI Uniform Crime Reporting program. We standardized the data to reflect violent and property crimes per 100,000, to account for population. Then, we aggregated a “crime score” by weighting violent crime at 80% and property crime at 20%. Though property crime is more prevalent, we figured that violent crime is more concerning to town residents. Then we adjusted the crime score for population size, giving more slack to larger cities. Finally, we ranked the cities based on their crime scores."

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