WASHINGTON, -

The Supreme Court has struck down key provisions of Arizona's crackdown on immigrants.

But the court said Monday that one much-debated part of the law could go forward - the portion requiring police to check the status of someone they suspect is not in the United States legally. Even there, though, the justices said the provision could be subject to additional legal challenges.

The decision upholds the "show me your papers" provision for the moment. But it takes the teeth out of it by prohibiting police officers from arresting people on minor immigration charges.

Justice Kennedy wrote the opinion for the court that was unanimous on allowing the status check to go forward. The court was divided on striking down the other portions.

The Supreme Court will issue its last opinions on Thursday, with its decision on President Barack Obama's health care overhaul expected to come down that day.

The court will begin its summer recess after announcing its decisions, with health care topping the list of undecided cases. The court also still has to decide cases on lying about military medals and real estate kickbacks.

The court cleared two of its major cases off its docket on Monday, throwing out much of Arizona's new immigration law and deciding that sentencing juveniles to life in prison without possibility of parole qualified as a "cruel and unusual" punishment.

After Thursday, the justices won't meet publicly again in the Supreme Court until the first Monday in October.