PALM SPRINGS, Calif. -

It was an effort to save the world, one healthy plate at a time.

 

"We have 58 countries around the world doing events today. It's to inspire, educate, and empower people to stand up for real food," Food Revolution Ambassador Michelle Globis said.

 

The inaugural Food revolution day at the Camelot Theater in Palm Springs highlighted a growing problem here in the U.S.

 

Globis stressed the importance of keeping an eye out for kids, especially when it comes to what they eat.

 

"We all get crazy and worried about homicides, but it's point eight percent. But sixty percent of deaths are from diet related diseases that are reversible," she said.

 

Chef Michelle Globis gives tips to keep in shape, such as read labels.

"If you can't pronounce it, don't buy it," she said.

 

She also says kids can and should help in the kitchen.

 

"They can look, it can be education, it can be fun. It brings the family together. Conversations happen," she added.

 

Another simple, but effective, waist trimmer - limit sugary drinks and go for water.

 

"Especially here in the valley, we need good clean water to drink and it's important everybody does because of the heat we experience here," Globis said.

 

Most importantly -- don't let prices intimidate you.

"Even though the quality is organic and grass-fed beef and so forth, because they're not buying the bags of chips and garbage, they have extra money in their weekly budget," she said.

 

"You're body's got to be worth more than the food you put into it," Thousand Palms resident Noreen Caswell said.