PALM DESERT, Calif. -

The Target data hack goes from bad to worse. The retailer originally said 40 million customers who shopped between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15 may have had their credit or debit card information stolen. Now, Target reveals 70 million shoppers had even more information swiped. 

"I did use cash today because of that," said Jennifer Manzi, a local Target shopper who wasn't affected by the hack.

"If these breaches happen and they happen often you don't feel secure," said shopper Johnny Meza. 

Home addresses, phone numbers, card expiration dates and more were all leaked, making it easy for thieves to steal your identity.  

"These people got a hold of all their financial information and email addresses they could open other cards and stuff in their name," Manzi said. 

Customers will not be liable for any fraudulent charges. Target is also offering one year of free credit monitoring and identity theft protection to all affected customers. 

"I'm sure they're doing everything they can to correct the situation," said Jim Collins, a shopper from Canada whose accounts weren't affected.

"I think some free charges for the next six months would be better," Meza said.

Security experts say the investigation is far from over. Target may not know exactly how extensive this breach is for some time.  

"In these kinds of investigations its common for an organization to learn more as they go so the fact that they found more information had been taken or more systems have been affected is not a surprise," said Tim Erlin, IT Strategist for TripWire. 

Still, the unexpected lesson in vigilance won't deter some from continuing to shop at the chain.

"We still used our card and hoping things are even more secure now," Collins said. 

Customers who used debit or credit cards at target between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15 are advised to contact their card issuer and get a new card with a new account number. 

They should also change their PIN and monitor their account carefully for any questionable purchases.