Jackson lawyers informed the court last week that Paris, 15, would not be available to testify in person because she is hospitalized for psychiatric treatment after a suicide attempt earlier this month.

In testimony last week, chef Kai Chase recalled how devastated Paris was in the first moments at home when she realized something was very wrong with her father.

"We were literally pulling her by her ankles down the stairs as she was trying to go back up, screaming 'Daddy, Daddy, Daddy!'" Chase testified.

Paris made millions cry two weeks later when she spoke at the public memorial for Jackson.

"Ever since I was born, Daddy has been the best father you could ever imagine," she said. "And I just want to say that I love him so much."

Jackson confided in his son about his business dealings at an early age. His testimony is expected to include revelations about what his father told him in his last weeks about whom he trusted and distrusted.

"Prince has always been, even at 12, the little man -- daddy's little man," Chase testified. "He wanted his father to be very proud of him, which Michael was."

"The weight of the world is on his shoulders, the eldest, big brother and father figure to his siblings," Chase testified. "It's a lot for him, growing, liking girls. He wishes his father was here to give him advice. It's devastating to him."

Life after his death

Jackson died just two weeks before he was to travel with Prince, Paris and Blanket to London where 50 concerts were scheduled over the next 10 months. Their father told them they would go on a long world tour after the London shows, which they were excited about, Paris said in her deposition.

After the tour, Jackson intended to buy a mansion in Las Vegas to serve as a base while he concentrated on making movies, his children said. To prepare them, Jackson hired a film professor from the University of Southern California to teach them movie-making techniques in their home school.

With their father gone, the children moved in with their grandmother in the same Los Angeles home where Michael Jackson lived at a teen. The veil of privacy -- which included wearing masks when in public with their father -- was soon replaced by occasional public appearances to honor their father.

The children spoke at the Grammys, a Hollywood Boulevard dedication ceremony, a tribute concert and to Oprah Winfrey. In each event, they appeared poised beyond their years.

The two oldest enrolled in a private school, a major change from the home tutoring their father provided.

Prince and Paris have both begun exploring careers in entertainment.

Prince worked several days as a "special correspondent" for "Entertainment Tonight" and acted in an episode of the television show "90210." Aunt La Toya Jackson arranged the jobs for him.

Paris signed up with an A-list Hollywood manager to help with her acting career earlier this year, but that's on hold while she is being treated.

Blanket, whose nickname came from the blanket his father often covered him with in public, is still taught at home, which is now a big hilltop house in a gated Calabasas, Calif., community.

"He does dance moves like his father," according to Chase, who was rehired as the children's chef last year.

Blanket, now 11, does "a lot of remembering what daddy did, and it's constant nonstop talking of him and his father's relationship together," Chase testified last week. He often wears a T-shirt from the Cirque du Soleil "Immortal" show based on his father's music, Chase said. "He wears it constantly."

The trial, in its ninth week in a Los Angeles courtroom, is expected to last into August, according to lawyers on both sides.